VOL. 5, NO. 5; SEPTEMBER
Table of Content

Articles

Clash video games: teacher insights on games in classroom K-12 pre- and in – service

Lexie Williamson


Abstract:

Games are no longer played just ‘for fun’, rather, they are seen as learning tools that can capture students’ interest and keep their attention. As a result, educators have been experimenting with these virtual environments to examine their place in the K-12 classroom. This study sought to examine both pre-and in-service teachers’ perceptions of gaming in the classroom environment.  Based on the literature review an 18-question Likert-scale survey was developed to coincide with traits of gaming on student learning and classroom use. 98 participants (53 In-service and 45 Pre-service teachers) completed the survey and four open-ended questions. Findings from this study revealed that both pre- and in-service teachers felt that gaming is a good use of technology for enhancing learning and motivating students. However, only around half of the participants indicated that they have or intend to use gaming in their teaching. Nevertheless, a majority of both pre- and in-service teachers felt that gaming in the classroom would grow in the next 5 years. It is our hope that results of this study will help fill a gap in the literature on gaming in the K-12 environment.

Tutoring and reciprocal peers in teaching and learning support

Lara Anderson


Abstract:

We are abounding with technologies. Some of them are suitable in an educational setting while others are not. The question is: “Do we use technology to differentiate or are we differentiating technologies?” If we are differentiating technologies, then we fail to tap into the strengths of the technologies in teaching and learning. We fail to go beyond the technical aspects of the instruments and, as such, they will remain as instruments per se. This paper attempts to put forward to you education technologies in the forms of hardware and software and how they are blended together to achieve effective communications. These technologies include podcast, reciprocal peer tutoring, eBeam and MIMIO pad. Some research findings are discussed to lend support to the technologies used.